"Typhoon: Climate, History and Society in the Philippines, 1565-2005 - Some Initial Thoughts" - Presented by James Warren


25th-28th September, 2007

Co-sponsored by the IOWC, the Dean of Arts Development Fund, the Department of East Asian Studies and the Department of History.

Professor in Southeast Asian Modern History at Murdoch University, Australia, James F. Warren, who gained his PhD in Southeast Asian History from Australian National University, is an internationally renowned scholar of Southeast Asian studies. Professor Warren, who speaks Dutch, Spanish, Malay-Indonesian, Samal Bajau Laut and Japanese, has been awarded a number of prestigious awards including being appointed Fellow of the Australian Academy of Humanities and receiving the Centenary Medal of Australia (2003) for 'Service to Australian Society and the Humanities in the Study of Ethnohistory.'

Professor Warren will be presenting a talk entitled "Typhoon: Climate, History and Society in the Philippines, 1565-2005 - Some Initial Thoughts," and a film, 'Broken Birds,' inspired by Warren's 1993 book, Ah Ku and Karayuki-san.


Public Lecture "Typhoon: Climate, History and Society in the Philippines, 1565-2005 - Some Initial Thoughts."

September 27th, 2007 6:30 pm Leacock 232

In the Philippines, more perennial damage is caused by typhoons and the floods that they trigger than by any other natural hazard. Each year, an average of 19 typhoons forms a potential threat to the well-being of the country. For Filipinos who have experienced repeated typhoon-related disasters, both as family members and as citizens of their communities, provinces and nation, the concept of natural hazard has been inextricably interwoven with the fabric of their lives and work. Typhoons have helped destroy and build the livelihoods of peasants, fishers, merchants and traders, as well as the aspirations of colonial and post-colonial administrators, entrepreneurs and meteorologists over nearly four and half centuries (1565-2005). This presentation relates to a 2-volume work in progress concerning the impact of cyclonic storms in the Philippines over five centuries.

More info: Download poster (pdf; 77KB)


Prostitution, Slavery and the Sex Trade in early 20th Century Singapore: Film screening and Discussion

September 26th 2007: 6:00 pm. Rutherford Physics Building Room 118; Film screening and presentation of 'Broken Birds' Ah Ku and Karayuki-san: Prostitution in Singapore (1870-1940)

September 28th 2007: 6:30pm Leacock 232; Film screening and presentation of 'Broken Birds' to be followed by a reception at 8:00pm, wine and cheese

Among the groups of workers whose labour built Singapore in the 20th century were women who traveled from China and Japan to work in Singapore as prostitutes. Japanese women were often tricked or forced into prostitution (karayuki-san) in Singapore and other parts of Southeast Asia at the end of the 19th century. This 45 minute dramatic performance explores the trade in women and children in Asia, and follows the daily lives of prostitutes in Singapore. 'Broken Birds' was inspired by James Warren's 1993 book, Ah Ku and Karayuki-san: Prostitution in Singapore (1870-1940) (Singapore: Oxford University Press)

More info: Download poster (pdf; 89KB)